I bought a can of longan to try today. On the label was a picture of peeled white fleshy fruit looking things that I assumed would probably taste like lychees. 

But no.

No, not at all.

More like the unwanted offspring of grapes and mushrooms.

Which, much to my surprise, is what they actually look like before they’re peeled.

healthyorganicgirl:

inlovewithhowyoufeel-fit:

Simple 2 ingredient recipes (use healthier versions of ingredients where possible or needed and enjoy :) )

☮Follow for fitspo, healthy eating&living, yoga and relaxing posts… and much more :) ☮

~*~ Follow for the best Fitspiration ~*~

(Source: BuzzFeed, via fuckyeahfitspo)

kayybearr:

hanthelion:

ikuskrap:

No way.

YO WHAT THE FUCK

going to try this tmr for breakfast

(Source: james-because-i-dont-know, via japanlove)

ohmyasian:

Better? Debatable. Innovative? Certainly.

tmirai:

arcanebarrage:

tarmduffin:

lakidaa:

lickypickystickyme:

If grandmothers around the world had a rallying cry, it would probably sound something like “You need to eat!”

Photographer Gabriele Galimberti’s grandmother said something similar to him before one of his many globetrotting work trips. To ensure he had at least one good meal, she prepared for him a dish of ravioli before he departed on one of his adventures.  

“In that occasion I said to my grandma ‘You know, Grandma, there are many other grandmas around the world and most of them are really good cooks,” Galimberti wrote via email. “I’m going to meet them and ask them to cook for me so I can show you that you don’t have to be worried for me and the food that I will eat!’ This is the way my project was born!”

The project, “Delicatessen With Love”, took Galimberti to 58 countries where he photographed grandmothers with both the ingredients and finished signature dishes.

He acted as photographer and stylist during each shoot with the grandmothers, taking a portrait of both the women and the food they made for him.

From top to bottom: 

Inara Runtule, 68, Kekava, Latvia. Silke €(herring with potatoes and cottage cheese).

Grace Estibero, 82, Mumbai, India. Chicken vindaloo.

Susann Soresen, 81, Homer, Alaska. Moose steak.

Serette Charles, 63, Saint-Jean du Sud, Haiti. Lambi in creole sauce.

The photographer’s grandmother Marisa Batini, 80, Castiglion Fiorentino, Italy. Swiss chard and ricotta Ravioli with meat sauce.

Normita Sambu Arap, 65, Oltepessi (Masaai Mara), Kenya. Mboga and orgali (white corn polenta with vegetables and goat).

Julia Enaigua, 71, La Paz, Bolivia. Queso Humacha (vegetables and fresh cheese soup).

Fifi Makhmer, 62, Cairo, Egypt. Kuoshry (pasta, rice and legumes pie).

Isolina Perez De Vargas, 83, Mendoza, Argentina. Asado criollo (mixed meats barbecue).

Bisrat Melake, 60, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Enjera with curry and vegetables.

gonna be shallow: I’d eat every single one of those meals (except maybe the vindaloo if it’s too spicy). also cute grandmas :3

I love… Alla dese

abuelitas ;_;

This is really fascinating. I would eat every one of these dishes.

(via citizenwasp)

kalun52:

hal-japan:

“Sakura Jelly“ in Japanese sweets

看上去很好吃的樣子QAQ【果凍控】

kalun52:

hal-japan:

“Sakura Jelly“ in Japanese sweets

看上去很好吃的樣子QAQ【果凍控】

(via fuckyeahjapanandkorea)

thegrimsleeper:

YO BITCHEZ, LOVE DUNKAROOS?
WANT TO MAKE A MASS QUANTITY OF IT AND SAVE MONEY AT THE SAME TIME??
WELL HERE YOU FUCKING GO:
1 box funfetti cake mix (DO NOT add the ingredients that you usually would to actually make the cake - you need just the mix)2 cups plain yogurt1/2 container of cool whip.Serve with animal crackers or graham crackers.
 
SIGNAL BOOST THIS. HELP ME FEED MY PEOPLE.

thegrimsleeper:

YO BITCHEZ, LOVE DUNKAROOS?

WANT TO MAKE A MASS QUANTITY OF IT AND SAVE MONEY AT THE SAME TIME??

WELL HERE YOU FUCKING GO:

1 box funfetti cake mix (DO NOT add the ingredients that you usually would to actually make the cake - you need just the mix)
2 cups plain yogurt
1/2 container of cool whip.
Serve with animal crackers or graham crackers.

 

SIGNAL BOOST THIS. HELP ME FEED MY PEOPLE.

(via captainscarletts)

misscherry:

alzati:

When Sandy Patangay left her home country of India to come to the United States, she never dreamed that she’d one day be able to bring something so special from her native culture to eager New York City consumers. After having completed her masters and begun working on Wall Street, she turned her sights away from the corporate world and began to channel her true passion - henna design - into a project that has become incredibly successful in an incredibly small amount of time. Transmuting traditional henna designs onto a whole new medium, Sandy creates beautiful cakes, cookies, and macaroons that have earned critical praise from some of the most renowned culinary experts. Thinking back on her decision to take this step in establishing her own business, she says:

So many times, I asked myself, whether this was a stupid move — walking away from a secure job to sell cakes. But now I can see I didn’t waste a single day. While I loved what I was doing on Wall Street, there’s only so much you can do to climb the corporate ladder. And how many people actually end up being the CEO? But when you follow your passion, the possibilities are endless.

Check out her website here.

oh god WOW

(via lupusdarkmoon)

Homemade Okonomiyaki dinner.

Homemade Okonomiyaki dinner.

fuckyeahfitspo:

hourglassofhealth:

rawlivingfoods:

Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.
“This is totally innovative, and has never been done before in a public park,” Margarett Harrison, lead landscape architect for the Beacon Food Forest project, tells TakePart. Harrison is working on construction and permit drawings now and expects to break ground this summer.
The concept of a food forest certainly pushes the envelope on urban agriculture and is grounded in the concept of permaculture, which means it will be perennial and self-sustaining, like a forest is in the wild. Not only is this forest Seattle’s first large-scale permaculture project, but it’s also believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.
Read More

Melbourne. Now.

Moving to Seattle…

fuckyeahfitspo:

hourglassofhealth:

rawlivingfoods:

Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.

“This is totally innovative, and has never been done before in a public park,” Margarett Harrison, lead landscape architect for the Beacon Food Forest project, tells TakePart. Harrison is working on construction and permit drawings now and expects to break ground this summer.

The concept of a food forest certainly pushes the envelope on urban agriculture and is grounded in the concept of permaculture, which means it will be perennial and self-sustaining, like a forest is in the wild. Not only is this forest Seattle’s first large-scale permaculture project, but it’s also believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.

Read More

Melbourne. Now.

Moving to Seattle…

thefitty:


Forever reblog, 1. The facts 2. The wording

thefitty:

Forever reblog, 1. The facts 2. The wording

(Source: inspirefreshproduce, via fuckyeahfitspo)

ohmyasian:

(viaminyungee)

2912. Hodduk 씨앗호떡. Fried and flattened ball of dough, oozing with melted brown sugar and stuffed with seeds and crushed peanuts. Korean street food at its best.

ohmyasian:

2907. Rice. Such a fundamental part of Asian culture for generations. Learn more about the rich history of rice in Asian culture here!

ohmyasian:

2907. Rice. Such a fundamental part of Asian culture for generations. Learn more about the rich history of rice in Asian culture here!

darth-faggus:

triickstar:

what the fuck

#this looks like the best day ever
Agreed.

darkewe:

Looks like Lindt has come up with some new chocolatey concoctions. 

Dinner is served.

Ok, reviews:

Wasabi Dark Chocolate: Even though it has a similar spicy kick to Lindt’s Chili Dark Chocolate, the flavor itself isn’t anywhere near as enchanting. To put it mildly, it tastes very much like eating a really good dark chocolate bar after some wasabi-heavy sushi. The difference is, the wasabi taste becomes more distinct with each bite and the bar itself is quite pungent with it. It’s not bad, per se, but it’s only good to me because of Lindt’s amazing dark chocolate. [1.5/5 for creativity]

Passion Fruit Dark Chocolate: This one is very aromatic and tasty. It’s filled with bits of almond to give extra texture and body, as the flavor and aroma of passion fruit is nearly equal to the dark chocolate’s in this bar. Something about it made my mind immediately think of wine - perhaps this would make a good treat to go with a glass or the mixture of the two distinct and rich flavors combined are just that reminiscent of red wine. [4.5/5 for richness]

Caramel with a Touch of Sea Salt: This one is a good-all-around bar - beginners and connoisseurs alike will be impressed. The ‘touch of sea salt’ referred to in its title is actually a considerable distribution of (seemingly caramelized) sea salt crystals spread evenly throughout the bar giving it a delectably crunchy texture - which is especially delicious when combined with the smooth, melt-in-your-mouth dark chocolate. [4/5 for versatility]