letsbuildahome-fr:

You can view the entire Island of Hashima on Google street view

(via hiromitsu)

fuckyeahjapanandkorea:

P1040456_1 by ۞ hinjuku 
fuckyeahjapanandkorea:

(by nkgwmski)
a-harlots-progress:


Rare photo of a Geisha after washing her hair, before styling it in the typical way. Ca. 1905.
THE REAL HAIR OF A REAL GEISHA … by Okinawa Soba on Flickr

a-harlots-progress:

Rare photo of a Geisha after washing her hair, before styling it in the typical way. Ca. 1905.

THE REAL HAIR OF A REAL GEISHA … by Okinawa Soba on Flickr

(via tsmskimonoyokubo)

masaothedog:

heyhocloudy:

archiemcphee:

Who is that cheerful man with the adorably double-braided beard and why is he dressed up as a Japanese schoolgirl? Kotaku’s Brian Ashcraft has the scoop: This is Hideaki Kobayashi and he’s known (and rightfully so) as “Sailor Suit Old Man.”

Recently, Japanese sites and Twitter users in Tokyo have spotted an old guy dressed in a sailor style school uniform—a truly unusual sight to behold. People were amused. People were baffled. What the hell was going on?!

Japanese site IT Media met Kobayashi and asked him the question on everyone’s mind: Why do you dress like a Japanese schoolgirl?

“That’s a difficult question,” said Kobayashi. “It’s not really something I’ve thought too deeply about. Hrm. I guess it’s because sailor suits look good on me?”

We hope Mr. Kobayashi has some inkling of just how awesome he is. We can’t stop smiling as we look at these photos. Head over to Kotaku to learn more about “Sailor Suit Old Man,” our new hero of Japanese weirdness.

YELL im glad i know who this beautiful man is now

follow your dreams dude

they DO look good on you

You know, they really DO look good on him. Especially with that beard. Kind of wish my beard would grow that long. 

(via lupusdarkmoon)

cruisingwithgunhead:

roachpatrol:

angerliz:

reindeergo:

space-coyote:

Have some awesome Japanese construction worker uniforms.

Plenty more at the source: http://www.tobi.jp/special01.html

Some of these share considerable overlap with old-school bosozoku. The longer coats almost look like Tokkofukku (Special Attack Jacket, worn by kamikaze pilots). Bottom center wouldn’t look out of place in Chiba City Spectre.

(via japanlove)

thekimonogallery:

This photo was taken ca.1905 by Herbert G. Ponting somewhere out in Japan’s countryside. Granny is looking through an H.C. White stereoscope at 3-D views published in the USA by the same company. Ponting carried sample views and viewers around with him to show people the kind of photos he was taking, and to make friends while putting his subjects at ease. Original image, and text utilized,  owned by Okinawa Soba of Flickr

thekimonogallery:

This photo was taken ca.1905 by Herbert G. Ponting somewhere out in Japan’s countryside. Granny is looking through an H.C. White stereoscope at 3-D views published in the USA by the same company. Ponting carried sample views and viewers around with him to show people the kind of photos he was taking, and to make friends while putting his subjects at ease. Original image, and text utilized,  owned by Okinawa Soba of Flickr

(via tsmskimonoyokubo)

explodingrocks:

Twenty-four pairs of Menuki. 18th to 19th Century
Menuki are ornaments placed under the hand wrap (tsuka ito) of a katana or wakizashi (Japanese swords) to fit into the palm for grip and originally meant to hide the mekugi (a small peg for securing the tsuka / hilt)
They define the character of the sword and can tie the owner to the sword.

(via pantstrovich)

buddhabrot:

Fire whirls are created by two different factors; one is a tornado that spins too close to a forest fire, or a spinning whirlpool of flame occurring in an area due to too much heat in immediacy.

Fire Whirl exist in an environment where there is organized source of angular momentum, either from wind shear or from the fire’s convection column, which in turn creates large swirl velocities as air is entrained into the fire plume (Battaglia et al. 2000).

Fire whirls occur most frequently where heavy concentrations of fuels are burning and a large amount of heat is being generated in a small area; Fire whirls are extremely dangerous, in 1923,during a Great Kanto earthquake in Japan, a fire whirl was created in a massive firestorm, that whirl alone killed 38,000.

(via dopeygirl-deactivated20131030)

ohmyasian:

2907. Rice. Such a fundamental part of Asian culture for generations. Learn more about the rich history of rice in Asian culture here!

ohmyasian:

2907. Rice. Such a fundamental part of Asian culture for generations. Learn more about the rich history of rice in Asian culture here!

sendmetoasia:

九份 (by saki-chi)

松井冬子 - Fuyuko Matsui (Read Interview)

fyeahhhthebizarre:

Which is the real Masakichi? Hananuma Masakichi was a Japanese artist who learned he was dying from tuberculosis. He wanted to leave a parting gift to the woman he loved. He made a statue of himself that is so life-like and realistic, people couldn’t tell which was the fake even while the real Masakichi stood next to it.
Working with adjustable mirrors, Masakichi made each body part separately using strips of dark wood. Records differ on the number of strips used but it is between 2,000 and 5,000. The statue is mostly hollow inside. No nails were used; the strips were assembled using dovetail joints, glue and wooden pegs. They are joined so perfectly that no seams can be seen, even with a magnifying glass. The wood was painted and lacquered to match his skin tone and reflects every tendon, muscle, bone, vein and wrinkle and pore.
Masakichi also handcrafted glass eyes that are so technically and visually perfect that they still baffle members of the optical profession.
What came next was stranger still. The artist bored a tiny, individual hole for every pore on his body and plucked the corresponding hair from that pore and inserted it at the exact position on the statue. In this manner he covered the entire sculpture with all of his own hair - head, beard, backs of his hands, legs, eyebrows and eyelashes (yep, and “that” part, too). Then Masakichi pulled out all of his own fingernails, toe nails and teeth and carefully put them in their exact place on the statue. As a finishing touch he gave the statue his glasses, his clothes, a sculpting tool and a tiny mask he had made. The figure appears somewhat emaciated because the TB was already taking it’s toll. He was 53 when the amazing statue was finished in 1885. Masakichi held a private exhibition of his work. He stood beside the artwork to the utter confusion and awe of the audience who could not tell which was him and which was not, nor comprehend how such a magnificent work had been created.
He managed to hang on for ten more years, and in spite of his incredible talent, died in poverty.
By the way - the real Hananuma Masakichi is on the right.

fyeahhhthebizarre:

Which is the real Masakichi? 

Hananuma Masakichi was a Japanese artist who learned he was dying from tuberculosis. He wanted to leave a parting gift to the woman he loved. He made a statue of himself that is so life-like and realistic, people couldn’t tell which was the fake even while the real Masakichi stood next to it.

Working with adjustable mirrors, Masakichi made each body part separately using strips of dark wood. Records differ on the number of strips used but it is between 2,000 and 5,000. The statue is mostly hollow inside. No nails were used; the strips were assembled using dovetail joints, glue and wooden pegs. They are joined so perfectly that no seams can be seen, even with a magnifying glass. The wood was painted and lacquered to match his skin tone and reflects every tendon, muscle, bone, vein and wrinkle and pore.

Masakichi also handcrafted glass eyes that are so technically and visually perfect that they still baffle members of the optical profession.

What came next was stranger still. The artist bored a tiny, individual hole for every pore on his body and plucked the corresponding hair from that pore and inserted it at the exact position on the statue. In this manner he covered the entire sculpture with all of his own hair - head, beard, backs of his hands, legs, eyebrows and eyelashes (yep, and “that” part, too). Then Masakichi pulled out all of his own fingernails, toe nails and teeth and carefully put them in their exact place on the statue. As a finishing touch he gave the statue his glasses, his clothes, a sculpting tool and a tiny mask he had made. The figure appears somewhat emaciated because the TB was already taking it’s toll. He was 53 when the amazing statue was finished in 1885. Masakichi held a private exhibition of his work. He stood beside the artwork to the utter confusion and awe of the audience who could not tell which was him and which was not, nor comprehend how such a magnificent work had been created.

He managed to hang on for ten more years, and in spite of his incredible talent, died in poverty.

By the way - the real Hananuma Masakichi is on the right.

(Source: thecadaverousportrait, via tsmskimonoyokubo)

fajeetas:

buggy-love:

midnattenswidunder:

theinturnet:

These cats have no fucking idea what is happening.

Oh my god.

Those poor cats and omg I can’t breathe at all.

this is 10% evil and 90% hilarious

(Source: japanlove, via japanlove)